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[Experiment Proposal]: Testing the value proposition of the Dragon Stove January 2019

Lean Phase: Value Proposition, Customer Segmentation

 

Assumption: That the Dragon Stove retains the value proposition of the Bukka 4.0

 

Time Box: 1-2 weeks

 

Key Metrics:

  • Comparison of the test results between the controlled Dragon Stove and Buka 4.0

  1. Average time to boil water

  • Repeat experiment three times

  1. Average wood consumption (g) in the time it takes to boil the water

  • Repeat experiment three times

  1. Dead load test

  • Comparison of the test results between the controlled Dragon Stove and the modified Dragon Stove with 60 mm extensions from the centre piece.

  • Comparison of the test results between the controlled Dragon Stove and the modified  Dragon Stove with 60 mm extensions from the centre piece and 10 mm holes drilled into the outer side piece of the stove.  



Success point: Equals or supercedes the same measurements for that of the Buka 4.0.

Green Light- Look at continuing production of the Dragon Stove.

 

Orange Light Range - Achieves 75-85% of the measurements of the Buka 4.0.

 

Orange Light- Look where potential losses may occur and look at fixing them, ensure validity and reliability of experiment is upheld.

 

Failure Point - Achieves less than 80% of the measurements of the Buka 4.0.

Red Light - Figure out what is going wrong with the Dragon Stove and if necessary, look for a significant redesign of the Dragon Stove model.

Control variables:

  • Ensure that the small metal dish is the same for each repetition of the test

  • Make sure that the quality of the wood is the same

  • Ensure that the water has the same starting temperature.

  • Use the same measuring jug

  • Use the same thermometer

  • Have the same person decide when water temperature reaches 100 degrees


Experiment build:

Perform the experiment testing all the key metrics on both Buka 4.0 and Dragon Stove:

  1. To test the efficiency of the Dragon Stove:

  1. (a) Measure the wood consumption in the time it takes to boil water.

  • Weigh the Dragon Stove with nothing in it

  • Prepare 5 kg of wood and place some of it into the stove.

  • Perform experiment 1) b) ( measure the time taken to boil water) given below

    • Add wood from the 5 kg load as required

    • Weigh the amount left from the 5 kg of wood

    • Allow the stove to cool completely down, then measure the weight of the stove with the remaining wood

    • Calculate the amount of wood consumed by determining the mass (g) used

    1. (b) Measure the time taken to boil water.

    • pour 1000 ml of room temperature water into a small metal pot

    • Measure starting temp of the water with a thermometer and record

    • Light the Dragon Stove using matches and firewood

    • Place small dish on the Dragon Stove and start timer

    • Keep thermometer in water and ensure that the tip doesn’t touch the metal dish

    • Monitor the thermometer until it reaches 100 degrees celsius and stop timer.

    • Record given total time it takes for the water to boil

    • Do the same with the Buka 4.0

  • Repeat experiment testing three times. Test both Buka 4.0 and Dragon Stove for consistency.

  • Compare the results for the Buka 4.0 and the Dragon Stove

  • If orange light, consider possible improvements

    If red light, consider going to a FNU lab to achieve accurate results.

  • Repeat entire procedure with the 60 mm extend stainless steel pieces from the central compartment.
  • Repeat entire procedure with the 60 mm extension and 10 mm holes drilled into the bottom of the outer side piece.
 
 
edited on 14th January 2019, 06:01 by Emma Petraglia

Alexander Teicher 5 months ago

Awesome to see some good testing being planned for the stoves. To clarify, is the Dragon a rebranded 5.1 (or 5.2)?? Either way the name sounds awesome.

Regarding the experiment, is there a way to ensure that the amount of wood used can be normalised, for example dividing the time taken to boil by the mass of wood used, or a fraction of this to reduce the influence a bit. Why I am suggesting this is if one test is run really hot with lots of wood and another with a more moderate amount of wood. I'm curious if you have thought of other ways to control the burn rate of wood across the tests, eg; If you will try to have a consistent point where the second load is added after 50% of the starting wood has been consumed, or if at a certain time more is added incrementally regardless of how much has already been consumed. Adding after a certain weight is burned could be achieved fairly simply by running the experiment on scales.

None of these suggestions are perfect with wood burning the most difficult to control, while you also want it to be dependent on the stove being used so perhaps not interfering with it at all is the best path? Perhaps doing similar tests with a time end point rather than boiling water end point and seeing how much wood was used in that time, measuring temp along the way of water? This could be incorporated into the water boiling test perhaps.

Looking forward to seeing the results of this testing.

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