Project Everest

[BLACK LABEL]: Sanitation Amisen - Sept 2019

[BLACK LABEL]: Sanitation Amisen - Customer Segment - Sept 2019

Lean Phase: Customer Segment 

Introduction: The project is focusing on increasing awareness around the current issues around female hygiene and sanitation. The project also aims to create a solution that helps mitigate these issues and increase the quality of female hygiene and sanitation in Amisen. 

Customer Segments Identified: 

  1. Women Undergoing Menstruation

Due to the nature of the project the general customer segment is women who undergo menstruation. This is because all these women have current hygiene and sanitation practices in place. When engaging with women in the villages of Jumtha, Vengara and Keisala it was found that 100% of women had a method to deal with menstruation. This ranged from the use of leaves to rags and disposable pads. 

Early Adopters: 

  1. Woman That Have Access to a Smartphone with Reliable Internet

With this application-based distribution service, it will be essential for the customers to have access to a smartphone that can install the application with the internet for successful use of the service.

  1. Earn an Income

Must earn a disposable income in order to pay for the service.

  1.  Aged 17-25

This age bracket was based upon this demographic being the most likely to use applications on smartphones. It was also determined due to this age demographic being more open to social change while older generations are still holding onto the stigma behind female menstruation.

  1.  Have Sanitary and Reproductive Related Illnesses

This service will provide a healthier solution than the current solutions in Amesin, thus the customers that have sanitary or reproductive related illnesses will be more likely to align with this project. 

 

[BLACK LABEL]: Sanitation Amisen - Problem Definition - Sept 2019

Lean Phase: Problem Definition 

Aim: Identify problems with the current methods used to deal with menstruation.

Introduction:

The population of Amisen is 18.6 million with a female population of roughly 9.6 million. Women in Amisen have a lack of access to education and different methods around female hygiene and sanitation with 70% of reproductive diseases being caused by poor menstrual hygiene and sanitation. It was found that outside of the town of Kiesala 83% of women do not have the appropriate means to dispose of sanitary items as well as 48% of girls drop out of school soon after they begin puberty. Women feel the need to drop out of school as they miss out on too much school days and fall behind in their studies. There is also a significant cultural stigma about menstruation that causes the issue to be difficult to discuss and deal with in many of the communities, particularly in the rural areas. Due to this stigma, we initially want to target women that are seeking a solution to their menstruation and sanitary issues. Overall, the need for this sanitation project is vital to the 9.6 million women in the country and also to aid in breaking down the negative stigma that has formed over generations in Amisen. 

Problems:

Through interviews conducted with women in the villages of Jumtha, Vengara and Kiesala, three main problems and the emotions related to these problems were identified. The data collected was collated as follows:

  1. Women feel both physically and emotionally uncomfortable during menstruation. This results in women struggling to participate in regular daily life activities. Their work and studies are also affected during their menstrual cycle due to the discomfort or embarrassment. This further results in making women feel isolated and disempowered due to missed opportunities and productivity..

  2. Women experience great frustration about the lack of adequate sanitation resources due to there not being any disposable bins or sanitary measures available for the community. 

  3. Women feel ashamed about dealing with/talking about menstruation due to the generalised stigma around menstruation, which suggests that women should hide this process and suffer in silence.

Current Solutions:

It was determined that most women use rags or leaves as sanitation products. This was identified in the more rural and less wealthy regions, such as Jumtha. The solution of using leaves has many deficiencies such as discomfort, itching, scratching and it is not very effective. Although, many communities use rags as they see this as a more sustainable option than disposable pads and more comfortable than leaves. However, the deficiency in this solution is that they are not cleaned properly and contract enormous amounts of bacteria, resulting in reproductive issues and further hygiene problems. The woman in more wealthy communities, such as Vengara, can afford to buy western style disposable pads from Sangrias and often do, as they are not available anywhere else. This solution costs $7 USD for a pack of 12 that lasts roughly a month. However, this solution is only available in Sangria’s general store. Expats however prefer to use devices they have brought from overseas.

 

[BLACK LABEL]: Sanitation Amisen - UVP - Sept 2019

Lean Phase: Unique Value Proposition

Aim: This post aims to describe the Unique Value Proposition of the Female Sanitation team in the republic of Amisen.

Big picture UVP: Over half the world's population is female and many lack the access to adequate female sanitation products. Our sanitation distribution service aims to give women access to more hygienic sanitation products in a discrete way. With female empowerment providing women to access all opportunities, increase income levels as women enter the workforce more and education levels as girls are able to stay in school for longer. This provides a women to claim their human rights to their bodies and health as the result is lower mortality rates, high adoption of contraception.

Problem Statement: Women do not feel comfortable during menstruation and experience great frustration about the lack of adequate sanitation resources . Women struggle to participate in daily life as they miss school or work due to menstruation. Women feel ashamed about dealing with/talking about menstruation due to the stigma around menstruation.

Problems Experienced in Amisen:

It has been identified that the women in Amisen, when asked, feel uncomfortable talking about and buying female sanitation products . This is an important issue as it restricts the ability of the women to continue participating in their daily activities. Due to the nature of Amisenian communities where the elder women educate young girls about menstruation it is very likely that young girls in these villages will be influenced to believe that menstruation is a taboo which further adds to the ever present stigma in the society. 

One of the key pain-points is women are unable to continue working to support themselves, their family and their villages. This means women lock themselves away into their house until the end of their menstrual cycle as they lose the ability to generate income for their family.

Another pain-point that was identified is that women are not able to be comfortable during their menstruation. As women around Amisen only have access to three different methods of female sanitation; disposable pads, leaves and rags. Disposable pads are the only comfortable alternative however, it has been found that 83% of women in Amisen do not have access to a disposal bin for their pads when they require one. This really inhibits the ability of disposable pads becoming sustainable.  

Women are placed at the risk of contracting a reproductive disease when using the current sanitation products. 70% of all reproductive disease in Amisen are due to poor menstrual hygiene. This has the potential to devastate a woman as she may be infertile due to these diseases. 

What does the UVP look like for each defined customer archetype:

The UVP of the Project Everest Sanitation project responds to the problems women face as above: 

  1. The distribution service is set up in a way that is highly discreet so that women don't feel the need to be uncomfortable when buying female hygiene and sanitation products. 

  2. The product provides the comfort of a disposable pad while delivering a far more sustainable product. This is because the product is reusable and washable so the presence of a disposal bin is not required, making it more sustainable in the long run. 

  3. The pad will be made out of a soft cotton material which allows it to sit more comfortably when compared to its alternatives such as leaves and rags. 

  4. Provides a hygienic sanitation products so that women who want a family are not inhibited to do so by poor menstrual practices that lead to a reproductive disease. This hygiene is achieved by designing a product that can be easily washed and dried before reuse. 

 

[BLACK LABEL]: Sanitation Amisen - Solution - Sept 2019

Lean Phase: Solution

Introduction: 

The population of Amisen is 18.6 million with a female population of roughly 9.6 million. Women in Amisen have a lack of access to education and different methods around female hygiene and sanitation with 70% of reproductive diseases being caused by poor menstrual hygiene and sanitation. It was found that outside of the town of Kiesala 83% of women do not have the appropriate means to dispose of sanitary items as well as 48% of girls drop out of school soon after they begin puberty.

Women feel the need to drop out of school as they miss out on too much school days and fall behind in their studies. There is also a significant cultural stigma about menstruation that causes the issue to be difficult to discuss and deal with in many of the communities, particularly in the rural areas. Due to this stigma, we initially want to target women that are seeking a solution to their menstruation and sanitary issues. 

Current Solutions:

The current solutions women are using in the country of Amisen involve leaves and old rags. These products provide discomfort, itching, scratching and is not effective. The use of pads is another solution women use but is deemed expensive and hard to locate.Those who use pads, generally feel very ashamed and embarrassed when purchasing these pads. 

Solution: 

The current solution we have tackles the main problems these women experience:

Being Discrete:

The product is designed to be discreet from key features such as:

  • Plain Packaging: This enables the product to be delivered to the women in a way that isn’t too obvious as the stigma around menstruation is frowned upon. Being discreets allows the women to feel comfortable and relaxed, as she no longer feels embarrassed when purchasing the product 

  • Designs: Each product will have a design such as making the product resemble a wash cloth which will allow it to be discreet. This also will allow for more effective cleaning of the product as the women no longer feel ashamed when washing it. The added benefit allows for a decrease in bacterial and reproductive illness due to unhygienic practices. 

Disposability:

  • Re-usable: The product can be re-used which will limit overall environmental impacts on landfill. More importantly, it allows for a prolonged use of each pad which eliminates the stresses of disposing of sanitary products in public places. The number of women that avoid school or work due to the embarrassment of disposing items, will significantly decrease. 

Distribution:

  • Location: The location to pick up this product will be close to each village which will overall limit travel time as accessibility will be close by. 

  • Woman to woman: The woman will be able to collect the product from another woman which will allow for more comfort in the distribution process. 

    The solution is composed of a sanitary kit that has 3 reusable pads. With proper washing and care the product has a lifespan of 6 months. The way women and girls access this product is through an app that is free to download onto a smartphone. The product would be collected from a medical clinic or a local corner store and they would pay on arrival. The women and girls would purchase this product every 6 months. 

The end result of this solution will provide the women of Ameisen the empowerment to continue their menstruation practices in a more beneficial and easier way. 

 

[BLACK LABEL]: Sanitation Amisen - Channels - September 2019

Lean Phase: Channels

Aim: To explore the channels that can be used to expand the potential reach of the product.

Channels:

  1. Medical Clinics: Local medical clinics with female doctors can be used as a channel to provide information to women who are having reproductive diseases due to hygiene and sanitation problems. Through this we can appeal to the pain point of these women which is the potential fertility risks as well as the pain of having a reproductive disease. Medical professionals can educate the women about the product and how it can mitigate the risk associated with the use of the current solutions. They will then collect expressions of interest from these women. This gives access to a market of women who are currently looking to overcome a problem that our solution can provide. This could also potentially lead to contact and sales with customers.

  1. Influencers: These are women who have a strong presence in society so their ability to influence young women is something that can be harnessed. By getting these women to promote our product we can reach out to young women as they feel empowered to buy the product as a woman, they look up to is also using it. The ability to reach young girls will play a key role in reducing the social stigma around menstruation in the long run as the knowledge passed down from generation to generation now allows women to comfortably address issues around menstruation. This opens the market up to many young girls as they are also the most likely to be on social media.

  1. Word-of-Mouth: This channel is able to reach a wide range of customer segments as when hearing it from another woman, a woman is more likely to buy the product. This is because hearing it from someone else creates a sense of trust with the product so more women are inclined towards the product. This inclination means the more women that have a positive experience with the product the more the product is shared with the women around them.  Word-of-mouth is also a very effective strategy as it is of no cost to the business. This means as long as the product provided is good women will continue recommending it to their friends and family.

  2. Sangria’s: As a retailer Sangria’s can be a channel as when we consider the women who visit to get sanitation products are already paying for disposable pads which is the closest alternative to the solution. This means hitting our target market as these women are the ones with disposable income as those without disposable income are likely to be using a cost-free alternative such as leaves or rags. This means we get inject our product into the market through targeting those early adopters. Women who shop at Sangria’s also generally feel less of a stigma compared to the rest of the community around buying these products as they are willing enough to walk into the store and purchase it.

  3. Village Collective Meetings: This channel plays a vital role in getting the product out to women in villages. However, they are not sustainable as getting a person to a village to deliver a sales pitch every time is something that is very difficult due to travel time and long-term physical presence in the country. This also plays a key role in injecting our product into the market. By first interacting with women face to face the process is quite personal. This will also lead to word of mouth beginning to take action as women now have a personal experience with the product they can share with family and friends.   

  4. Schools: Schools have the ability to reach out to young girls while they are still easily impressionable. This is supposed to have a similar implied impact as  influencers. If at a young age girls can feel comfortable talking about menstruation they will pass this on to future generations which in the long run can reduce the stigma around this. School teachers especially those who value a female's education can be target with the pain point that girls are missing out on the opportunity to pursue their dreams as the drop out of school as they miss too many days due to menstruation. The use of schools as a channel creates the opportunity to reach out to young girls who are still open to change. 

Next Moves: Develop the appropriate marketing material for each of these channels ensuring that they target the pain point for each customer segment.

 

[BLACK LABEL]: Sanitation Amisen - Key Metrics - September 2019

Lean Phase: Key Metric

Aim: Understand the various metrics that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the product.   

Metrics:

Acquisition: The number of downloads per month as this allows the comprehension of how many women are interested in the app as the more people who download it the more effective our channels become as more women are actively seeking a solution.

Activation: The number of women who make their first purchase. This shows how many women convert from being interested to paying currency. This is a good measure of the usability of the application as if this is difficult it will hinder to customer journey so less people will go from an acquisition to an activation. 

Retention: The number of women who come back to make a second purchase to continue the use of these menstruation products. This allows an understanding of how effective the women find the product as the more women who come back, the more value they see in the product.  

Revenue: The amount of money generated through total sales of the product through the app. This demonstrates how many units of the product that are being sold. 

Referral: The number of women who are referred onto the product. This metric also plays a role in understanding how wide the reach of word of mouth is currently. 

Next Moves: Use the data collected to identify the effectiveness of each channel. 

 

[BLACK LABEL]: Sanitation Amisen - Cost and Revenue Structure - Sept 2019

Lean Phase: Cost and Revenue Structure  

Aim: This post outlines the fixed and variable costs and revenue structures for the Female Sanitation distribution service through a smartphone application.

Female Sanitation Application and Kits: The distribution service will incur costs relating to several partnerships and the manufacturing and materials of the kits. The application will allow the customer to order their desired kit (menstrual materials) and wait for delivery via a partnership deal (Tino’s Tuk Tuk’s) who will receive a % of the sale once delivery is complete. It will be delivered to a predetermined discrete pick-up location chosen via the application (Sangria’s (also commission) & Medical Clinic (discounts)). This will result in a cash payment on site, where the money will then be collected by a team and distributed.

Cost Structure:

Fixed Costs: 

There are no fixed costs.

Variable Costs: 

Materials and manufacturing: the materials and manufacturing will incur costs related to the making of the sanitation pads, and also the sowers wages.

Tino’s Tuk Tuk’s: This partnership will result in the cost of a % of sales given due to the service of deliveries. 

Sangria’s: This partnership will result in the cost of a % of sales due to the service of being a pick-up point and also a place of sale. 

Medical Clinics: This partnership will result in the loss of revenue due giving Medical clinics a discount from our products in line with being a pick-up point for the kits.

Channels: The costs of paying influencers to market our product to the wider community will result in a & of the sales due to the service of marketing.

Revenue Structure:

Fixed Revenue:

There is no fixed revenue. 

Variable Revenue:

Deposits: Before the service begins, deposits will be made by customers that are interested in receiving this product. They will receive an extra sanitation pad in their first purchase of a kit. 

The Application: The app is free and downloaded online onto a smartphone through an application store.

The Menstrual Kit: The application will allow the customer to order their desired kit (menstrual materials) and wait for delivery via a partnership deal (Tino’s Tuk Tuk’s) to a predetermined discrete pick-up location (Sangria’s & Medical Clinic). This will result in a cash payment on site, where the money will then be collected by the partner at pick-up location and then the team. 

Next Move:

As the business increases and matures it is inevitable that the firm will incur larger costs regarding the application, materials and manufacturing, delivery and pick-up locations. These costs will be in the form of commission, discounts, employees, application upkeep and further research and development.  

Possible revenue streams could be found with developing greater stakeholder partnerships. As the business grows, the partnerships will grow with the business thus it will be essential to maintain these relationships and ensure that business is sustainable. The smartphone penetration within Amisen is predicted to grow substantially within the next five years with Asian Development Bank estimated an increase of 70% in smartphone usage. Due to this, the prospect of mobile money and online banking becomes more realistic and a potential revenue replacement for cash. This will be easier to distribute the revenue made from the sale among the partners and collect from the customers. These partnerships would see a commission revenue structure adopted, whereby for each sale the distributor would receive a % of the sale.

To validate the next phase, it is imperative that the current minimum viable product is validated and that the customers see the utility and need in the present product and distribution service at a reasonable but given price. It is also essential to ensure that the partnerships are mutually beneficial with this distribution service. 

 

edited on 19th September 2019, 02:09 by Jade Tran

Lily Partridge 4 months ago

Comments:
- Big picture UVP: Think even bigger. What are the greater opportunities of female empowerment through adequate sanitation practice? Economic benefits from a stronger workforce, the ability for girls to stay in school longer, increasing the average education rate, with more access to empowerment women are able to make more decisions about their bodies and health, meaning lowered mortality rates, high adoption of contraceptives, etc. This is the kind of level you need to think about here.
- What does the solution actually look like? What is it? You've just described features. How often are they purchasing it?
- If the app is free, it's a part of the solution, not a source of revenue.
- Don’t forget that if you’re using influences or staff on the ground, you will need to pay them.

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